Training your cat not to bite – Part 1

Start by getting kitty/cat into a gentle game of play fighting. Continuously praise the cat all the time he remains gentle. Gradually increase the excitement and intensity of the game, keeping your eyes glued to kitty. As soon as you see that the cat is getting too excited or he begins to expose his claws or teeth, immediately freeze and “play dead.” This usually causes a cat to calm down and retract its claws. If kitty complies, then resume playing. If not, the play must not resume until kitty calms down and retracts his claws. If kitty bites hard or scratches you, sharply scream “OUCH,” immediately stop playing, walk away and ignore him.

Cats, especially kittens, love to play. Abruptly ending a play session is an extremely powerful reprimand. With a few repetitions, kitty will learn that it is his own overly rambunctious or aggressive behavior that brings an end to all the fun.

While your cat is learning not to bite and claw you, it is equally as important that you provide kitty with something he can pounce on, attack, grab with his claws and sink his teeth into.

Unless your cat has real prey to hunt, you are going to have to provide the play prey. If you simply toss a few toys on the floor, your cat may give them a few swats then quickly lose interest. It is up to you to make the toys fun. Play should be an interactive game between you and your cat. Tie a toy to the end of a length of string. Drag it around your house with kitty in pouncing pursuit. Pet stores are full of both inexpensive and exotic toys for your cat. Use your imagination and create your own toys. The idea is to stimulate your cat’s interest and participation. Two 15 minute play sessions a day will work wonders in venting your cats excess energy as well as fulfilling his predatory instincts. Read more on Biting and Scratching.

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